Fishing on Stilts

Fishing on Stilts

Stiltwalker.  Pieter Bruegel the Elder. This image is from this image...can you find the stiltwalker in the original, here? Thanks to Wikimedia Commons for access to both these beautiful, exquisitely detailed, historical images.

Stiltwalker, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1560. This image is from inside this image…can you find the stiltwalker in the original? Thanks to Wikimedia Commons for access to these famous, exquisitely detailed, historical images.

A new soul-colleague contacted us to offer us work (per our sole request for help after the fire, at the end of that post).

We began to get to know each other.

And then I told them their goal was golden, but the approach they wanted help with was bassackwards. (I was embarrassed to be how I am but it was true. I know something is wrong about this but I can’t tell if I should not be embarrassed to be how I am or if I should use a different word than “bassackwards.” Your input is welcome.)

I wanted a metaphor to explain why the approach seemed so–um, wrongheaded–to me. After 24 hours, my  metaphor came to me: it was like fishing on stilts.

You can do it. You can fish on stilts.

It’s just that you wouldn’t want to if you realized you didn’t have to. There are much more direct ways to fish.

The realizing part was my job. My soul-colleague quickly came around to a much more direct way of fishing.

But THEN I had to ask (Divine Curriculum, fractal nature of reality, other as mirror to the self, mote in someone else’s eye/log in my own) how have been fishing on stilts?

How am I making receiving harder on myself than it means to be?

Excellent work, Divine Curriculum. Thank you for the metaphor. It’s so good I wanted to serve you up a share: how have you been “fishing on stilts”? How can you dip into the stream right up close? (This works for vegans, y’know. We could be harvesting watercress.)

I know when  I do it, it’s because it seems really normal: everyone I ever met or knew or grew up around was always fishing on those stilts. I just thought that was how you did it.

Really, a good metaphor helps us out so much.

2 Comments
  • David 'Black Feather' Nagy
    Posted at 13:41h, 11 May Reply

    Works fine if you’re a heron, or an osprey and your ‘stilt’ is your observance tree. They know just the right direction to approach the fish from so that reflections are minimized. As humans, we seem to need (or believe we need) mechanical advantages (extensions of our minds?).

    • Beth
      Posted at 13:19h, 12 May Reply

      I didn’t say it clearly enough but I think (at least) we need to get right down in that stream!

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