Time for Trauma

Time for Trauma

The Door to Hell, a burning natural gas field in Derweze, Turkmenistan. It´s actually bigger than it looks. Three 17 mm shots stitched together. Image: Tormod Sandtorv (original picture) Hellbus (derived work).

Take time for trauma: this is “the Door to Hell, a burning natural gas field in Derweze, Turkmenistan. It´s actually bigger than it looks. Three 17 mm shots stitched together.” Image: Tormod Sandtorv (original picture), Hellbus (derived work).***

Take Time for Trauma

I wrote you here that I would be back to you in a few days with a follow-up post about getting organized. That was over a week ago.

How you do anything is how you do everything.  (Apply it and you’ll see this Zen proverb’s truth.)  Continuing not to post is just not how I do things.

But there’s this trauma, see, that you don’t know about, coming between our last post on getting in your communications organized here at Winter’s end, and our next post on getting your calendar organized.

This is how the Divine Curriculum teaches me trauma’s connection to communications and calendaring:

  1. It’s ok to keep communications short while working through trauma.
  2. It is possible to calendar both communications and trauma.  Yes, my trauma waits til I have time because I set aside the time it needs.
  3. It’s not ok not to communicate when you’ve said you will and in fact, it makes things worse. (But remember #1 and see #4).
  4. It’s ok to communicate, renegotiate and recalendar your agreements, including agreements to communicate.
  5. There is deep trust that comes from raising clarity around calendaring and communicating.

 

***Sometimes the Picture of the Day at Wikimedia Commons is so perfect for the RAISING CLARITY post of the day that searching for one is unnecessary, I can simply use the Picture of the Day (posted each day anew on Wikimedia Commons’ home page). iToday was one of those days: the “Door to Hell,” for a post on trauma. “Bigger than it looks,” with the little witness looking onto it calmly. Yep, that’s me, too.  Thank you, found visual poetry.

1 Comment
  • beth crittenden
    Posted at 04:01h, 11 February Reply

    I feel like this applies to my communications to myself, as well. I’ve felt frozen in some overwhelm since I moved. I judge that the to-do list isn’t getting smaller as quickly as I expect it to/think it should. I feel bound by something I can’t see. Here’s to getting clearly back to deep trust and being able to move towards motion again, the flowing kind.

    P.S. Pretty picture. Intense.

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